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Prentice to sing for hospice in Te Anau
Prentice to sing for hospice in Te Anau

14 April 2024, 4:28 AM

Despite recent hard times, the Te Anau community is pulling together with a charity concert on 10th May, to raise much needed funds for Hospice Southland.In a combined effort, the town’s three service clubs, Te Anau Lions, Fiordland Rotary and Te Anau Kepler Lions, have pooled their resources to produce the fundraising concert.Headlining the evening will be Southland’s own internationally recognised singer, Suzanne Prentice with local Te Anau ukulele band, From the Top, stepping up to open the first half of the concert.Internationally known with hits such as ‘When I Dream’, ‘One Day at a Time’ and ‘Funny Face’ and as an inductee of the Australian Country Music Hands of Fame, Prentice was appointed an Officer of the Order of the British Empire, for services to music in 1994.While still performing professionally on regular basis she also donates a lot of her time to charitable entities.More recently she has been involved in local politics and community projects including being a member of the Invercargill Licensing Trust and Foundation and the Otago/Southland Rescue Helicopter Trust.Prentice, as the events coordinator for Hospice Southland’s funding arm, has a vested interest in making sure the vital care facility reaches its funding targets.“The work of Hospice Southland, which covers Southland and Wakatipu Basin, has never been more needed than now with increasing numbers of patients needing the palliative care and respite offered. Hospice Southland gets about 42% of its funding from the government and it’s clearly not enough and the organisation needs to raise a further four million dollars annually to operate effectively”.Prentice said, “I am very excited to perform in Te Anau and very happy to be part of this fundraising effort”.A spokesman for the combined service clubs, Trevor Lyall, said they were extremely fortunate to have an entertainer of Ms Prentice’s standing and he hoped the community would jump at the chance to hear the renown singer in their own town.“Not only do you get a great concert with an international entertainer, but you get to support such a worthwhile cause which is constantly in demand”.“Practically every aspect of putting on this concert has been donated, from the performers and the venue to a large part of the cost of the sound and lighting, and we expect to be able donate all the money from the concert.""Te Anau’s businesses have again stepped up and provided accommodation and meals, have heavily discounted costs that cannot be avoided while others have offered to cover any shortfall so that the full cost of each ticket will end up in Hospice coffers”.The concert is at the RealNZ Fiordland Community Events Centre on Friday May 10 and is being promoted as ‘An Evening with Suzanne and Friends’.Te Anau band 'From the Top. Photo: SuppliedMs Prentice will be supported in the first half of the evening with local ukulele band ‘From the Top’.CLICK HERE for more information.CLICK HERE to purchased tickets online.

Proposal to solve Fiordland's immediate worker accommodation crisis
Proposal to solve Fiordland's immediate worker accommodation crisis

12 April 2024, 6:50 AM

A proposal to help solve Fiordland's immediate worker accommodation crisis as early as this Spring, was presented at two meetings in Te Anau today (12 Apr) by the Fiordland Business Association (FBA) and Timaru's Genius Homes.Genius Homes' Kiwi 1 and 2 bedroom range of housing is part of a FBA proposal to solve Fiordland's worker accommodation crisis. Graphic: Genius Homes/SuppliedIf successful, up to 30 - one to three bedroom - low cost prefabricated homes could be built at Genius Homes' south Canterbury factory before being transported and erected on an Alpine Drive site in Te Anau.The ambitious proposal could see the first homes delivered by November 2024.The proposed Te Anau site of low-cost housing for worker accommodation. Graphic: SuppliedHowever it is envisaged the site will only remain occupied for up to 10 years, after which time the homes may need to be relocated.FBA spokesperson Nathan Benfell said today's meetings were about getting feedback, seeing if there was interest in the proposal and if it was "the right thing for the community".While happy with the turnout, feedback and new ideas, he acknowledged there was still a lot of work to be done.Benfell said that a survey carried out last year by the FBA had shown 56% of respondents required between one and five staff but were hampered to do so because of a lack of accommodation.While the concept has been on the table since late December, the current proposal developed after a chance meeting between Genius Homes and a member of the trust that owns the Alpine Drive site, at the Southern Fielddays, Benfell said.The proposal hinges on investors or businesses purchasing the finished and installed homes, valued at between $159,000 and $187,000, and paying their share of rental on the land.Benfell envisaged the completed facility would be run by a body corporate, be landscaped and include play areas and possibly a garden.Genius Accommodation Chief Executive Kingsley Smith said the concept had been done a lot in Australia.Genius Homes had been involved with similar projects in both Queenstown and the McKenzie District, however both involved a single investor, Smith said.Smith said the current proposal had been designed with affordability and speed in mind.Southland District Council councillor and local business owner Sarah Greaney said she was encouraged by the way the FBA was looking for a solution to the problem.However she said there was still a lot of questions to be answered and exploring to be done.Ray White Real Estate Te Anau owner Don McFarlene said there would be a lot of work still to be done, with resource consents being the biggest battle.However he said it was a positive move and he could fill 12 of the houses tomorrow with people who already have jobs.

$18m development proposed for Motupōhue Bluff Hill
$18m development proposed for Motupōhue Bluff Hill

11 April 2024, 10:54 PM

An new $18 million tourism development, designed and led by Te Rūnaka o Awarua, is planned for Motupōhue (Bluff Hill).The Te Taurapa o Te Waka – Motupōhue Visitor Experience will include a 25m tall Taurapa (canoe sternpost) sculpture on Motupōhue (Bluff Hill) - visible from the Bluff township - along with an interpretation centre, sculpture trail, a walking track - using of digital, location-based storytelling - and a new car park. The project is part of the Bluff Motupōhue 2020 Tourism Master Plan, which was facilitated by Great South in partnership with Te Rūnaka o Awarua and the Invercargill City Council. Te Rūnaka o Awarua trustee Dean Whaanga said for mana whenua south is up and north is down, meaning Motupōhue is the true top of the country. “It’s only fitting that we have a world-class visitor experience here,” Whaanga said. The proposed plan for the site shows two pou representing tūpuna (ancestors) flanking the existing roadway to the summit, conveying the significance of the site.Proposed interpretation centre for Motupōhue (Bluff Hill). Graphic: Supplied Te Taurapa o Te Waka would have a sculpture trail, including a larger-than-life-size puka (anchor), which relates to several kōrero such as Te Waka o Aoraki and the oral tradition of Te Ara a Kiwa.The rope of the puka (anchor) would wind its way to the summit, where the broken waka of Aoraki would be represented.Great South chief executive Chami Abeysinghe said Te Taurapa o Te Waka was an outcome of the master plan, which recognised the strategic importance of Bluff and its potential to be a vibrant hub for the community, as well as visitors. “It’s part of a long-held vision to highlight the cultural importance of Motupōhue. It will add real depth to what is currently on offer for locals and visitors alike.” A coordinated plan for Bluff was identified as being crucial within the Murihiku Southland Destination Strategy 2023-2029 and aligns with the New Zealand Aotearoa Government Tourism Strategy.Funding to support Awarua Rūnaka with the development of the concept plans came from the Government’s Strategic Tourism Assets Protection Programme.The next step in the process was to create a business feasibility and fundraising strategy.

Orange heavy rain warnings still in place in south as bad weather moves north
Orange heavy rain warnings still in place in south as bad weather moves north

11 April 2024, 10:19 PM

More rain is forecast to fall on the West Coast overnight and orange heavy rain warnings remain in place for Buller, Westland and Southland, as of Thursday night.MetService said heavy rain and strong north to northeast winds were forecast for many places.Large waves were expected to affect the West Coast of the South Island and heavy rain was forecast for the far south of the South Island, MetService said.It continued to be a significant weather event for Westland, MetService said in its latest update.The bad weather is also now hitting the North Island, with orange level heavy rain warnings in place for Bay of Plenty, Taranaki and Coromandel Peninsula.MetService meteorologist Heath Gullery told the Nights programme Westland's orange rain warning was in place until 6am on Friday."There's going to be improvements in weather across the South Island, so those areas like Southland and Fiordland, up the West Coast through Westland Buller, and the top of the south Island which has also seen some significant rain around Tasman and northern Marlborough - all of those areas will see an improvement throughout tomorrow, rain becoming patchy and light."More than 800mm of rain has fallen in parts of Westland over the last two and a half days, and there was concern about how high two major rivers would get.Hokitika and Waiho Rivers peaked over their warning level on Thursday night, but have since been dropping, and were being closely monitored by emergency officials.These are the South Island areas under an orange level heavy rain alert, note that the rain amounts are in addition to what has already fallen in the area.Westland District south of Hokitika up to 80mm of rain is expected from 8pm Thursday to 5am FridayBuller up to 45mm of rain from 8pm Thursday to 2am FridaySouthland up to 40mm of rain from 8pm Thursday to 3am FridayNelson up to 80mm of rain from 8pm Thursday to 2am FridayMarlborough, Nelson in the Bryant Range, also inland Marlborough west of Blenheim and north of the Awatere River up to 120mm from 8pm Thursday to 9am FridayCanterbury High Country up to 80mm within 20km east of the main divide from 8pm Thursday to 5am FridaySouthern Lakes up to 50mm of rain east of the main divide from 8pm Thursday to 7am FridayGullery said the front was forecast to move across central and upper North Island overnight and then eastwards through those areas on Friday."We do have a series of heavy rain watches and warnings, extending down from Northland down to Taupo and across the Bay of Plenty and with that rain there is the possibility of localised downpours."In the North Island, there are three areas under an orange level alert, although several other areas are under severe thunderstorm watches and heavy rain watches.Coromandel Peninsula up to 120mm from 3am Friday to 3pm FridayBay of Plenty, Rotorua up to 160mm of rain from 4am Friday to 11pm FridayTaranaki at Mount Taranaki up to 180mm from 8pm Thursday to 11am FridayRNZ is New Zealand's statutory civil defence lifeline radio broadcaster, providing vital information and updates as they come to hand.The National Emergency Management Agency (NEMA) advises that in times of crisis or civil defence emergency a battery powered radio or a car radio remain essential lifelines if power is out and other forms of communication are unavailable.More than half a metre of rain with more to comeSome parts of the West Coast had already recorded 800mm of rain by Thursday evening, with more set to come before the orange level heavy rain warning expires on Friday.Motorists were being urged to stay off the roads in the Westland District on Thursday evening and to only travel if necessary.West Coast Emergency Management said the roading network across the district had been affected by the bad weather and trees were down, a number of roads were closed and slips and surface water were making driving hazardous.Marlborough Civil Defence is asking 70 households in the township of Spring Creek near Blenheim to evacuate their homes by 9am on Friday due to the risk that a river stopbank might fail.Heavy rain moving through from the upper Wairau catchment is expected to raise the Wairau River level significantly on Friday.Twenty Civil Defence and iwi volunteers were door knocking and leafletting the 70 homes on Thursday evening. Residents were told they could evacuate on Thursday night if they wished.A power outage at Hannahs Clearing was worse than originally thought, and the area remains disconnected due to the loss of several power poles.Westland Emergency Management said areas south of Hannahs Clearing, including Arawhata, Jackson Bay and Neils Beach, were likely to be without power for several days. An update on the timeframe for it being restored was expected at midday on Friday.On Thursday evening, the bad weather cancelled or delayed about 60 domestic arrivals and departures at Auckland Airport as strong winds buffeted the region.Fire and Emergency said it had had about 18 callouts in the Auckland region, relating to trees coming down and powerlines lifting and there were isolated power outages.There is a severe thunderstorm watch in place for Auckland until 2pm on Friday.Reproduced with permission

DOC job cuts plan: Tourism, backcountry huts, flora and fauna at risk, groups say
DOC job cuts plan: Tourism, backcountry huts, flora and fauna at risk, groups say

11 April 2024, 6:31 AM

Environment and recreation groups are warning the proposed cuts to Department of Conservation staff could cause long-term consequences and losses of flora and fauna as well as backcountry huts.The Department of Conservation (DOC) is proposing to cut 130 roles to meet the government's mandated 6.5 percent reduction in spending."We have tried to find options that would have the least impact overall on people and on conservation outcomes," DOC said in a statement.It will not know the exact number of job losses until it has consulted with staff.Forest and Bird said DOC's budget was about the same as Christchurch City Council's, but it was expected to look after nearly a third of New Zealand's total land area.The 6.5 percent reduction in spending overall comes on top of a 21 percent fall in funding due to the end of the Jobs for Nature and other time-limited funded programmes.DOC’s funding overall was due to drop from $880m this year 2023/2024 to $728m in 2026/27.Federated Mountain Clubs (FMC) president Megan Dimozantos told Checkpoint they were concerned about the effect job cuts would have on the mahi on the frontlines."DOC already has the impossible task of managing a third of the landmass of New Zealand on less than half a percent of the government budget."We're incredibly concerned about the budget cuts, that there's not a lot of fat there for the department as it is, and that we're really concerned about the the conservation outcomes that we're going to see under these cuts and the loss of skills and experience in the department that may occur."The department's plight to protect the conservation estate was highlighted in a DOC briefing to Conservation Minister Tama Potaka late last year: "Despite all we are doing to try to protect and restore habitats and assist species, nearly 4000 native species are either at risk or threatened with extinction. When species are lost from New Zealand, they are often lost from the whole world, and many are only holding on in small numbers because of intensive management".The Lake Waikaremoana Great Walk is surrounded by native bush. Photo: RNZ/Sally RoundLikewise, Dimozantos was worried for the future of New Zealand's flora and fauna."I mean, there's 4000 species that we're at risk of losing, isn't there? So, you know, I think that that's probably going to be the primary concern is that we'll lose things that we can't get back."And I suppose from FMC's perspective as well, you know, that also applies to the to the places that people are recreating. We don't want to lose our backcountry huts network either."The smaller, more basic huts that sit sort of a bit further out of the reach of the crowds ... those are probably the ones that we're most concerned about. They are looked after largely by volunteers at the moment, but obviously they could well be in the firing line with budget cuts."Potaka told reporters the government had been consistent in its messaging about preserving the frontline workers for essential services."I have worked with the CEO and had discussions about the processes being undertaken but they're following their own internal guidelines, but as I say we're in the proposal stage and all things will be confirmed in due course."[I have] had couple of conversations with the director-general to make sure that it's done in a respectful and mana-enhancing and judicious manner and I think she's been very deliberate and the agency has been very focused."Cut costs with more modest huts - FMCDimozantos acknowledged the work of volunteers, who she said the department already relied heavily on to pick up gaps in conservation efforts."Those people are really engaged with DOC and we work alongside DOC as partners. But obviously there's going to be a lot more pressure on even those resources now."A shift to more basic facilities on public conservation land could help ease cost pressures, she believed."I think probably a lot of our Great Walks are looking a bit posh these days, and certainly if you look at the likes of Mintaro Hut, I think that costs over $4 million to build, whereas if you were to build a basic backcountry hut, a little six-bunker on the backcountry, you're probably looking at about 150 grand."There's certainly places that that we could be a little more modest in the backcountry and still we're providing an awesome experience for people who want to go there."The new Mintaro Hut under construction on the Milford Track.The Mintaro Hut on the Milford Track, pictured under construction in 2020. Photo: RNZMany of DOC's 967 backcountry huts were ageing and in poor repair, while the length of track being maintained has grown from 11,000km to 15,000km over the last 14 years.The 2023 briefing to the minister also stated the current visitor network was "not sustainable" and taking staff and cash from biodiversity efforts.But Dimozantos did not believe raising fees for visitors would be wise; the more people paid, the more they expected from the public facilities, which would again mean higher costs on the department.Losing a tourism drawcard?A leading environmentalist said the job cuts at DOC risk damaging New Zealand's most valuable asset - nature.Environmental Defence Society chairperson Gary Taylor said the proposal was the latest move in the government's war on nature."Not only are they introducing regressive laws to de-prioritise environmental criteria when making decisions about projects, they are now cutting funding for our core agency that manages one-third of our country."New Zealand's conservation estate was the main drawcard in one of its biggest exports - tourism - while agriculture also relied on the country's clean green image, Taylor said.The Kōhanga Atawhai - Manson Nicholls Hut has been rebuilt at Lake Daniell in the Maruia Valley. Photo: Supplied / DOCForest and Bird also warned of "long-term consequences for nature and the economy" from the proposed job losses.Advocacy manager Richard Capie noted this came on top of cuts at other government agencies involved in protecting New Zealand's natural environment, including the Ministry for the Environment, Biosecurity New Zealand and the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Resarch."The same day that the government released a report saying that New Zealand communities and economy are at risk if we do not protect our natural ecosystems and landscapes, it announced it was cutting jobs and the budget of the agency that leads Government conservation work," Capie said."New Zealand cannot afford to lose highly skilled and dedicated Kiwis who are charged with protecting our threatened species and their habitats."Not only do we have a government axing environmental protections through its fast-track reforms we now have the prospect of these cuts during a climate and biodiversity crisis. It makes no sense - not environmentally nor economically."According to the Sustainable Business Council, 70 percent of New Zealand's exports depended on natural resources."We know that investing in nature-based solutions, increasing wetland protection, and controlling browsing mammals reduces the impacts of climate events and improves our ability to reduce emissions. A strong environment is the backbone of a strong economy," Capie said.Reproduced with permission

‘It’s been annoying’: Town battling joy riders at domain
‘It’s been annoying’: Town battling joy riders at domain

10 April 2024, 10:50 PM

Vandalism in a small Southland town has prompted fresh measures to keep perpetrators out.Tūātapere Domain is set for a new gate in hopes it will stop people tearing up the local field.It follows the installation of CCTV cameras at the site last year in a trial to reduce wilful damage and boost security for the nearby pump station.With several incidents occurring after the cameras' installation, Southland District Council determined they had not eliminated the problem.That included one in June 2023 where the grounds were ripped up by a vehicle which also crashed into a storage building, causing significant damage.When Police requested to review footage from the reported incident, the council could not pull identifying features because of camera quality, security lighting and poor weather.The cameras had also proven impractical due to the fact council staff had to travel to the domain to obtain footage, and only once the privacy officer had approved a request by Police.Tūātapere Te Waewae Community Board chair Anne Horrell said Police expressed a preference for a gate which they would likely take responsibility for managing.“We’re a bit sad about it, because we like to think that our domain is accessible to all people,” Horrell said.“Sadly, when you get to the winter and you have a car ripping up the oval, they can do an incredible amount of damage, because it’s damaged anyway.”Horrell said the vandalism so far had “been enough that it’s been annoying”, adding the domain was taken care of by volunteers.Although the $1000 camera trial had been ineffective in preventing damage to the domain, it would remain in place.A possible memorandum of understanding between Police and the district council would also be discussed to allow direct access to footage, Horrell said.Council staff would now arrange quotes for the new gate.LDR is local body journalism co-funded by RNZ and NZ On Air

REVIEW: Highland Storm delivers powerful performance at Tartan Festival show
REVIEW: Highland Storm delivers powerful performance at Tartan Festival show

10 April 2024, 9:15 PM

Easter Monday saw the end of the Easter holiday weekend but in Te Anau the holiday was ushered out with a skirl of the bagpipes in a magnificent performance from the band, Highland Storm.A near capacity audience was treated to a highly polished concert, featuring some of the south’s best musicians, which was produced by the Tartan Festival committee in place of the usual full weekend’s activities.This is to become a normal format with the full Easter Tartan Festival event now planned for every other year instead of every year as in the past.Highland Storm lead vocalist Simon Green and Simon Thompson. Photo: ProFocus PhotographyThe scene was set when band members distributed ear plugs to the audience before proceedings got under way which let everyone know that this was going to be a loud and powerful performance and they didn’t disappoint.The band lineup included three of the south’s well known bagpipers David Pickett, Greg Lindsay and John Teviotdale along with lead guitarist Simon (Tomo) Thompson of band Triple Shot fame, drummer Aaron Ives who has performed with bands such as Radiowave and Pappa Rocks, and vocalists Simon Green and Hollie Longman who also performs with Radiowave and Pappa Rocks. She also played keyboard.Highland Storm's Hollie Longman. Photo: ProFocus PhotographyEach band member was clearly a highly accomplished individual but together they reached new heights in their entertaining delivery of a generous set list of toe tapping favourite covers.From the haunting opening with the Gael, theme from the Last of Mohicans to the last encore Don’t Stop Believing, the fast-paced entertainment was expertly guided by the capable and experienced frontman, Simon Green.Each performer showcased their musicianship with solos from each of them and the audience was treated to an array of superb mastery of each of their instruments.The whole performance was further enhanced with professional sound and lighting provided by sound man Tom (Papa T) (Bluff), with gear from Massav Productions and lighting tech Errol Heads (Dunedin), owner/senior tech of Ahead Solutions.Particular crowd favourites were renditions of Copperhead Road, Sweet Child of Mine, Whiskey in the Jar and a very popular arrangement of Loch Lomond.A group of young Highland dancers added to the entertainment with a couple of well presented and coordinated dance pieces to the rock music taking place on the stage.The concert was performed in three parts with a 10-minute break between each set and the audience, whose ages ranged from primary school age to 80-year-olds, got well into the mood with many taking to the floor to dance the night away.Even the bagpipers were able to inject some extra entertainment with an unexpected descent to the the auditorium during one of their performances.Everyone left at the end of the evening well satisfied from their night out, which most agreed was world class.

‘Dangerous’ abandoned car irks resident
‘Dangerous’ abandoned car irks resident

09 April 2024, 11:56 PM

An Invercargill pensioner says it is “shocking” it took almost three weeks for an abandoned car wreck to be removed from his street.From March 20, a vehicle was parked facing the wrong direction on Ythan St following a crash at the nearby intersection.Brian Middlemiss, who lives opposite where it was parked, had spoken to both Police and Invercargill City Council about the issue, but was none the wiser about when it would be resolved.Resident Brian Middlemiss is pleased the car has been removed, but questions why it took so long. Photo: Matthew Rosenberg/LDRMuch to his relief, the car was finally removed on Monday afternoon.“I’m pleased it’s gone. Why couldn’t that happen a couple of days . . . after the accident?” he said.“I think it’s shocking that it took so long."Middlemiss said the car was a "danger" while it was parked up because of how close it was to the intersection.The vehicle had been broken into, and he noted it was both facing the wrong direction and unwarrantable, meaning it was parked illegally.Prior to its removal, he told Local Democracy Reporting he would deliver it to the owner if he could.“If I’d have taken a load of rubbish and dumped it outside the owner of that car’s place . . . the council would come around and pick it up and shift it.”In response to questions, Invercargill City Council said it did not remove the vehicle.Council environmental services manager Gillian Cavanagh said her organisation had investigated the vehicle on Ythan St, but would only become involved if Police requested them to remove it.That would happen if there was no identified owner of the vehicle, Cavanagh said.If a vehicle was stolen or involved in a crash, it was Police responsibility.It was then up to the owner and insurance company to remove it once investigations were complete.A Police spokesperson said the vehicle’s owner had initially said they would pay for the cost of towing the vehicle.The person was issued an infringement related to the crash, and the case had since been filed, the spokesperson said.“The responsibility of removing abandoned vehicles in the first instance falls to the registered owner, and if they do not take action, the council.”It is believed the car owner has moved the vehicle. The owner of the car could not be contacted.The council had disposed of six vehicles this calendar year, none of which were the result of an accident.Removal came at an average cost of $360, but the organisation was able to pass that on to the owner if they knew who that was.LDR is local body journalism co-funded by RNZ and NZ On Air

2024 Academy Southland inductees named
2024 Academy Southland inductees named

08 April 2024, 9:45 PM

The 2024 SBS Bank Academy Southland foundation year induction features an extended group of 14 promising young athletes across a diverse range of sports.The two-year academy programme aims to provide vital support for predominantly senior high school-aged athletes considered capable of representing Southland on the national or international stage.Last year’s graduates include New Zealand under 23 road cycling champion Marshall Erwood and track running star Kennedy Taylor, who recently confirmed a four-year scholarship with the University of Maine in the United States.SBS Bank Academy Southland manager Jason McKenzie said this year’s cohort had been one of the hardest to select for some years, given the depth of talented applications.“In the end we have gone with a slightly bigger group than the 12 we would normally select. Even then there are some young athletes who will be disappointed at not getting selected, and rightly so,” McKenzie said.“We’re looking forward to working alongside these Foundation Year athletes, their parents and their coaches to help them become the best they can be.”2024 Academy Southland inductee Charlotte Morris. Photo: SuppliedOver the two years of the academy programme, athletes receive a solid grounding in athlete life, mental skills, strength and conditioning at the Mike Piper Training Centre, and nutrition.Academy co-ordinator Carly Anderson said the goal was to support young people to be successful both in sport and life.“It’s really important that we take a holistic approach and aim for young people who have all the tools to be well-rounded athletes and people.”An important aspect of the programme has been providing consistent and trusted nutrition advice through the academy’s registered dietician Aimee Hall.“Many young athletes don’t appreciate how vital fueling the body well is for health, growth and development,” Hall said.“There is a lot of misinformation out there, especially on social media. Learning how much to eat, how often, and where to get food from will mean young athletes can feel good at training, be able to concentrate on their studies, continue to develop, and be happy.”2024 Academy Southland inductee Isla Smith. Photo: Supplied Another exciting development has been the partnership with the Rangatahi Leadership Group, an Active Southland-supported initiative focused on providing Māori and Pasifika rangatahi with the tools to succeed within their chosen sports.For the second year in a row, an athlete has progressed from the Rangatahi programme into the academy, providing another pathway for talented young people to achieve their goals.2024 SBS Bank Academy Southland Foundation Year  Connor Gilliland (athletics) - Central Southland CollegeOllie Davis (athletics) - Central Southland CollegeCarlie Scherp (athletics) - Southland Girls’ High SchoolJack Heslip (Olympic clay target shooting) - Northern Southland CollegeShahen Wijesinghe (cricket) - Southland Boys’ High SchoolCharlotte Morris (cricket) - James Hargest CollegeIsla Smith (football) - Southland Girls’ High SchoolLibby Crawford (netball) - James Hargest CollegeRuby Duffy (netball/basketball) - Southland Girls’ High SchoolOlivia Gill (rugby) - Central Southland CollegeSualo Lafoga (rugby league) - Southland Girls’ High SchoolNoah Smith (tae kwon do) - Verdon CollegeEmily Forsyth (cycling) - James Hargest CollegeRiley Faulkner (cycling) - James Hargest College2024 Academy Southland inductee Sualo Lafoga. Photo: Supplied

CLASS ACTION: Myross Bush School
CLASS ACTION: Myross Bush School

08 April 2024, 9:26 PM

What a busy start to our year at Myross Bush School. We welcomed our new Tumuaki/Principal(Ms Wendy Kitto) and our new tamariki and whānau to our school on the first day of term with a mihi whakatau.It was a lovely way to start the school year and we appreciated everyone who took the time out of their busy days to join us in this welcome.  We have completed our athletics learning and showcased this in our school athletics day held at the school.All students performed well on the day, showing their determination and skills in a range of throwing, jumping and running activities.It was wonderful to see a range of parents supporting all tamariki.Several students went on to compete in the Southern Zone athletics events.They represented themselves and the school proudly.Some students competed in the Southland Athletics Championships over the weekend and again proudly represented the school.Tino pai to mahi.   Alongside all of this learning, students have been busy in the classroom.They have picked up where they left off with their learning.The learning spaces are excited to bring the learning alive through their action learning and diving into some hands on learning activities.The curiosity students are showing and their problem solving to bring their ideas to life is wonderful to watch. We are looking forward to a great year at Myross Bush School and we look forward to sharing some highlights with you.                   

Te Anau chef named Beef + Lamb Ambassador
Te Anau chef named Beef + Lamb Ambassador

08 April 2024, 8:55 PM

Te Anau chef and The Fat Duck Gastropub co-owner Cameron Davies has been named a 2024/2025 Beef + Lamb Ambassador.This is the second time Davies has been awarded the title, having been a recipient in 2022/23.He shares this year's title with Chetan Pangam of Wellington's One80° Restaurant, Dean Thompson of Schnappa Rock in Tutukaka and Mrinal Ghosal of Mudbrick Restaurant in Waiheke Island.The prestigious Beef + Lamb title is awarded annually in recognition of the immense talent within the New Zealand culinary scene.Foodservice Manager, Lisa Moloney said the chefs would help shine a light on the New Zealand food story with inspiration, innovation and elevation of New Zealand grass fed beef and lamb at the heart.“We see the role of the Ambassador Chefs to lead the way in celebrating New Zealand producers and their produce by telling the paddock to plate story through their menus.”Davies said he felt proud and humbled to be chosen for the second time as a Beef + Lamb Ambassador Chef.“I grew up in rural New Zealand so to be able to support the farming community, especially here in Southland is pretty special.”To enter, chefs submitted an application featuring their most creative, tasty and visually appealing beef and lamb dishes.Applicants were shortlisted with the help of a Beef + Lamb New Zealand advisory panel, with the finalists having their dishes anonymously assessed in their restaurants earlier this year by culinary-trained experts.

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